BMET Wiki
Advertisement

Quantum mechanics (QM) is a set of scientific principles describing the known behavior of energy and matter that predominate at the atomic scale. QM gets its name from the notion of quantum, and the quantum value is the Planck constant. The wave–particle duality of energy and matter at the atomic scale provides a unified view of the behavior of particles such as photons and electrons. While the notion of the photon as a quantum of light energy is commonly understood as a particle of light that has an energy value governed by the Planck constant, what is quantized for an electron is the angular momentum it can have as it is bound in an atomic orbital. When not bound to an atom, an electron's energy is no longer quantized, but it displays, like any other massy particle, a Compton wavelength. While a photon does not have mass, it does have linear momentum. The full significance of the Planck constant is expressed in physics through the abstract mathematical notion of action.

The mathematical formulation of quantum mechanics is abstract and its implications are often non-intuitive. The centerpiece of this mathematical system is the wavefunction. The wavefunction is a mathematical function of time and space that can provide information about the position and momentum of a particle, but only as probabilities, as dictated by the constraints imposed by the uncertainty principle. Mathematical manipulations of the wavefunction usually involve the bra-ket notation, which requires an understanding of complex numbers and linear functionals. Many of the results of QM can only be expressed mathematically and do not have models that are as easy to visualize as those of classical mechanics. For instance, the ground state in quantum mechanical model is a non-zero energy state that is the lowest permitted energy state of a system, rather than a more traditional system that is thought of as simple being at rest with zero kinetic energy.

Advertisement