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Positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) is a term used in mechanical ventilation to denote the amount of pressure above atmospheric pressure present in the airway at the end of the expiratory cycle. The equivalent in a spontaneously breathing patient is CPAP. PEEP is set on the ventilator.[1][2][3][4]

Link[]

Positive+End-Expiratory+Pressure at the US National Library of Medicine Medical Subject Headings (MeSH)

Reference[]

  1. thefreedictionary.com > positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) Citing: Saunders Comprehensive Veterinary Dictionary, 2007
  2. Caramez MP; Borges JB; Tucci MR; Okamoto VN; Carvalho CR; Kacmarek RM; Malhotra, A; Velasco, IT et al. (2005). "Paradoxical responses to positive end-expiratory pressure in patients with airway obstruction during controlled ventilation". Crit Care Med 33 (7): 1519–28. doi:10.1097/01.CCM.0000168044.98844.30. PMC 2287196. PMID 16003057.
  3. Smith TC, Marini JJ (1988). "Impact of PEEP on lung mechanics and work of breathing in severe airflow obstruction". J Appl Physiol 65 (4): 1488–99. PMID 3053583.
  4. Kondili E, Alexopoulou C, Prinianakis G, Xirouchaki N, Georgopoulos D (2004). "Pattern of lung emptying and expiratory resistance in mechanically ventilated patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease". Intensive Care Med 30 (7): 1311–8. doi:10.1007/s00134-004-2255-z. PMID 15054570.

Video[]

Respiratory_PEEP

Respiratory PEEP

PEEP

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