BMET Wiki
Advertisement
Microshock

Microshock

About[]

Microshock is a risk in patients with intracardiac electrical conductors, such as external pacemaker electrodes, saline filled catheters, or weak or old heart tissue within the heart. A current as low as 10uA (microampere) directly through the heart, may send a patient directly into ventricular fibrillation. While Microcshock is a theoretical possibility the unintended induction of VF has not been reliably reported anywhere in 40 years. Modern devices include protections to limit current in cardiac-connected circuits to safe levels. [1]

Microshock is a very low level current applied directly to the heart. This can lead to inadvertent fibrillation and death. Microshocks are usually a very low magnitude current, on the order of tens of microamperes. One possible mechanism for microshocks is through chassis leakage currents, if these are sufficiently high, and if an appropriate path to ground exists through a patient's heart. However, leakage currents can also be a cause of macroshock, a much higher magnitude shock applied to the external body. [2]

References[]

  1. Gross J (2005) Less Jolts from Your Volts: Electrical Safety in the Operating Room. ASA Refresher Courses in Anesthesiology. 33(1):101-114
  2. Carr, Joseph J., and Brown, John M., Introduction to Biomedical Equipment Technology, second edition, Prentice Hall Career and Technology, 1993, page 409.


Links[]

See also[]

Advertisement